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Home Health Care

Every day according to AARP, in millions of homes across the country, scores of home health aides are helping to meet the basic needs of the elderly. They are hired to cook, clean and generally assist with daily living activities. Currently, almost 10 million adults age 65+ receive care at home or in residential care settings other than nursing homes. We will see number skyrocket as the 65+ population rises to more than 70 million in 2030, according to U.S. Census Bureau.

One of the biggest challenges with home health care is currently there are no federal regulations covering home-care workers, other than very broad standards for care provided under Medicaid. Along with the lack of regulations, many of those providing care have received virtually no training and in many cases they are not background screened by their employers.

Because so many of the elderly are concerned if they speak up they will end up in a nursing home they do not communicate abuses to their families who are often long distance. In fact, studies show that more than a third of people with dementia suffer psychological or physical abuse at the hands of people providing care.

Elder abuse from home health care aides comes in various forms including:

  • Physical abuse such as striking, pushing or pulling on patients
  • Sexual abuse
  • Verbal abuse
  • Not turning or moving the bedbound which can lead bedsores
  • Humiliating the patient by taking degrading photos and posting them on social media
  • Restraining to a chair or bed
  • Drowning by not supervising the patient in the bathtub
  • Not feeding or providing liquids
  • Overmedicating or under medicating

What should you do if you suspect abuse or your loved one has been injured, abused or died from poor care from a home health care aide?

Immediately call Olsman MacKenzie and Wallace to schedule a free initial case consultation, we are experienced at handling challenging cases such as these.